Monthly Archives: April 2014

The category of cardboard rectangles and bits of wool string (I)

I am conducting an educational experiment: teaching children in year 2 and 3 (7-8 years old) about categorical concepts, more precisely about monoidal categories. Monoidal categories are an appealing formalism because of their connections with diagrams [1]. So we just … Continue reading

Posted in teaching | 2 Comments

Why computers can’t (really) think (II)

This is a follow on to my previous post Why computers can’t think. The reactions and comments to it helped me to tighten and clarify the argument. I am going to use the term┬ámental event in order to denote a … Continue reading

Posted in anticomputationalism, armchair philosophy | 1 Comment

Why computers can’t think

I have a weakness for philosophy of the mind, but I find most of the writing on the topic either impenetrable or laughable. Recently, a good friend who is a philosopher recommended Searle’s book Mind: A Brief Introduction. It is … Continue reading

Posted in anticomputationalism, armchair philosophy | 6 Comments