Category Archives: armchair philosophy

Computability: The Greatest Law of Physics

Wigner famously declared mathematics to be “unreasonable effective” in the natural sciences. It is indeed something magical about the fact that if we have a mathematical theory and some mathematically representable aspect of reality then we can carry out abstract, … Continue reading

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Chalmers’s Digital Radio

In previous posts I gave arguments against the apparently widely held belief, at least amongst readers of this blog, that all mental states and phenomena, consciousness in particular, are reducible to computational processes in the brain: computationalism. Whether this is … Continue reading

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Two kinds of mathematics

Preliminary reading: “The Origins and Motivations of Univalent Foundations” by V.¬†Voevodsky’s [PDF] “Proofs and refutations” by I. Lakatos [link] “On proofs and progress in mathematics” by W. Thurston [link] I find the recent surge in interest in the use of … Continue reading

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Why computers can’t think (III)

This is the final instalment of a series of posts on machine consciousness. It’s a fascinating topic but now that the Easter holidays are over I will need to refocus my attention on the equally fascinating topics I am actually … Continue reading

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Why computers can’t (really) think (II)

This is a follow on to my previous post Why computers can’t think. The reactions and comments to it helped me to tighten and clarify the argument. I am going to use the term¬†mental event in order to denote a … Continue reading

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Why computers can’t think

I have a weakness for philosophy of the mind, but I find most of the writing on the topic either impenetrable or laughable. Recently, a good friend who is a philosopher recommended Searle’s book Mind: A Brief Introduction. It is … Continue reading

Posted in anticomputationalism, armchair philosophy | 6 Comments